Archives

Richard Koppe: American Painting and the New Bauhaus

An instrumental member of the New Bauhaus School in Chicago, Richard Koppe’s artwork demonstrates complex compositions of structured lines, geometry, and color. This exhibition draws from the museum’s large collection of Koppe artwork to explore his unique approach to line, plane, color and form in the evolution of his paintings. Organized by Vanja Malloy, Director & Chief Curator, and Grace McCormick, ’22, Curatorial Intern. Museum Hours: Tuesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Mondays & University holidays

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Collection Highlights: 5,500 Years of Art

Explore the newly reinstalled permanent collection galleries, which include many never-before-seen works of art and new acquisitions. In place of a traditional chronological organization, this new installation places artworks from across the globe and time in conversation with one another. Museum Hours: Tuesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Mondays & University holidays

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Each One Inspired: Haudenosaunee art across the homelands

Composed of over 52 contemporary artworks by Haudenosaunee artists from all six Haudenosaunee Nations across what is now New York, this exhibit takes a closer look at the multiple sources of inspiration in contemporary Haudenosaunee art including: treaties, the natural world, community and family members, ancestors, oral histories, and connection to land. Collectively, the artworks in this exhibit break convention by challenging the expected, disrupting stereotypes and non-Haudenosaunee historical narratives. As the artists and their works demonstrate in this exhibit, the continuous trajectory of Haudenosaunee art has been in existence since long before 1607 and the arrival of Europeans. What does a canon of Haudenosaunee art look like? Each One Inspired: Haudenosaunee art across the homelands will give visitors a sense of the dynamic, loud, punchy, glittering, somber, and intricate ways Haudenosaunee artists respond to, react to, and draw inspiration from their communities and histories; in doing so, this exhibit asks visitors to question their own relationships to Indigenous histories, people, and lands. Curated by Gwendolyn Saul, PhD, Curator of Ethnography and Ethnology, these works are on loan from the  Contemporary Native American Art Collection, New York State Museum, Albany. Museum Hours: Tuesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Mondays & University holidays

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Clifford Prince King: We Used to Lay Together Exhibition

Light Work presents We Used to Lay Together, a solo exhibition of photographs by Los Angeles-based photographer Clifford Prince King. A Clifford Prince King is a self-taught queer Black photographer from Arizona. The images in this exhibition focus on King’s life in Los Angeles. In his work, King’s lifestyle and experiences are starting points to explore desire, intimacy, and day-to-day life with HIV. King’s images chronicle himself and others located in lamp-lit domestic settings. We see a brotherhood of men enacting moments of domestic bliss, nude bodies in the moments before or after a sexual encounter, and the side effects and routine of living with HIV. After King’s diagnosis, he focused anew on understanding the legacy of the AIDS crisis and the artists who responded to it. He took refuge in the words and images of those who once shared an experience like his own, and his work evokes that history while developing a language all his own. In talking about his practice, King returns time and again to the life-affirming aspects of his relationships. In We Used to Lay Together, King has compiled a body of work that explores affection in all its varieties―the simple parts of intimacy, often overlooked but universal. An opening reception and gallery talk with Clifford Prince King will be held on Thursday, September 16, at 6 p.m. in the Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery. Signed copies of his exhibition catalog, Contact Sheet 213, will be available after the talk. The reception is free and open to the public. Light Work is located in the Robert B. Menschel Media Center at 316 Waverly Avenue, Syracuse, New York, 13224. Gallery hours, effective Wednesday, September 1, 2021, are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. — Light Work is thrilled to welcome patrons back into our exhibition spaces for in-person self and staff-guided tours, openings, and artist talks. In reopening, Light Work pledges strict adherence to the most up-to-date COVID-19 safety protocols in order to protect patrons, artists, students, and staff.

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Clifford Prince King: We Used to Lay Together | Gallery Talk

Light Work presents We Used to Lay Together, a solo exhibition of photographs by Los Angeles-based photographer Clifford Prince King. A Clifford Prince King is a self-taught queer Black photographer from Arizona. The images in this exhibition focus on King’s life in Los Angeles. In his work, King’s lifestyle and experiences are starting points to explore desire, intimacy, and day-to-day life with HIV. King’s images chronicle himself and others located in lamp-lit domestic settings. We see a brotherhood of men enacting moments of domestic bliss, nude bodies in the moments before or after a sexual encounter, and the side effects and routine of living with HIV. After King’s diagnosis, he focused anew on understanding the legacy of the AIDS crisis and the artists who responded to it. He took refuge in the words and images of those who once shared an experience like his own, and his work evokes that history while developing a language all his own. In talking about his practice, King returns time and again to the life-affirming aspects of his relationships. In We Used to Lay Together, King has compiled a body of work that explores affection in all its varieties―the simple parts of intimacy, often overlooked but universal. An opening reception and gallery talk with Clifford Prince King will be held on Thursday, September 16, at 6 p.m. in the Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery. Signed copies of his exhibition catalog, Contact Sheet 213, will be available after the talk. The reception is free and open to the public. Light Work is located in the Robert B. Menschel Media Center at 316 Waverly Avenue, Syracuse, New York, 13224. Gallery hours, effective Wednesday, September 1, 2021, are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. — Light Work is thrilled to welcome patrons back into our exhibition spaces for in-person self and staff-guided tours, openings, and artist talks. In reopening, Light Work pledges strict adherence to the most up-to-date COVID-19 safety protocols in order to protect patrons, artists, students, and staff.

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