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Asiya Zahoor: Literary Imaginaries of Kashmir

Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs South Asia Center presents Literary Imaginaries of Kashmir This talk aims to highlight as to how we  understand Kashmiri writers’ positioning as the representative of Kashmir, an ascription both accepted and rejected by their writings and a situation parallel to the political positions available to the Kashmiri thinker or writer today. Asiya Zahoor  Asiya Zahoor is a Sanford H. Taylor Post-doctoral Fellow at the Asian Studies Department. Asiya Zahoor studied Caribbean  literature, Psycholinguistics and Kashmiri Literature at the Universities of Kashmir, Oxford University in the UK. and Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi.  Asiya’s film, “The Stitch” has won the critics award for Best Short Film  at the South Asian Film Festival. Asiya has written on migration, psycholinguistics, Caribbean and Kashmiri  and  Urdu literature. She has also written poetry and short fiction. Her latest book, Serpents Under my Veil, is a collection of poems. For more information or to request additional accommodations, please contact Emera Bridger Wilson, elbridge@syr.edu.

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High Energy Physics Seminar: What’s the matter with matter?

The Department of Physics is pleased to welcome Dr. Daniel Johnson to give a talk on the high energy physics research at the LHCb experiment at CERN. From the protons and neutrons in the chair you’re sitting on, to the constituents of the farthest star you might see tonight, most of the visible stuff in the Universe consists of quarks bunched together to form ‘hadrons’. But, hidden in plain sight, is one of the most awkward aspects of modern particle physics: although we possess a theory — quantum chromodynamics (QCD) — which defines, in principle, how quarks bind to form hadrons, real-life calculations with that theory are fiendishly difficult and accurate predictions are often impossible to obtain. The implications of this uncertainty reach across particle physics. Johnson will describe how LHC data have begun a revolution in the understanding of hadronisation, and the implications that could have for searches for ‘New Physics’. Next, realizing that visible matter accounts for only about 15% of the matter in the Universe, he will turn the focus to the remaining 85%, so called ‘dark matter’. Although direct searches for a particle accounting for dark matter have so far drawn a blank, Johnson will discuss a novel dark matter paradigm and how LHC data might be leveraged to shed light on this mysterious topic. Note: This is a virtual event. Please contact phyadmin@syr.edu for the zoom link.

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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Becoming a Professor as an Asian-American Woman, Formerly Undocumented Immigrant, and First-Generation College Student

Join Professor Junko Takeda as she talks about her perspectives on assumptions and attitudes that women of color in general, and Asian and Asian-American students and faculty in particular, face in academia. She will share her own experiences as an Asian American woman who immigrated to this country as a young child, grew up in the American South as an undocumented immigrant, became a first-generation college student and trained as a historian working in the field of the early modern French empire.   Event sponsored by the Maxwell School – Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.   For information or to request accommodations, please contact Yvonne Yu at Maxwelldei@syr.edu. Immediately prior to event, International Students Affinity Group will be held in the same room at 3:00PM-4:00PM.

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High Energy Physics Seminar: Beauty Quarks behaving awkwardly, or is New Physics hiding in flavor?

The Department of Physics welcomes Dr.  Rafael Silva Coutinho, who will be presenting a seminar. Dr. Coutinho is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Zurich, mainly involved in searches for lepton flavor universality breaking in rare decays of B mesons. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Warwick, where his work focused on the searches for asymmetries in the decays of neutral B mesons and beauty baryons to final states containing long-lived particles. Abstract: While the Standard Model of particle physics successfully describes all known particles and their interactions, it is broadly accepted that it is an incomplete description of Nature. It predicts that particles known as beauty quarks should decay into final states involving either muons or electrons at equal rates. However, recent data from CERN’s LHCb experiment suggests that this is not the case. Could this be evidence for the long-awaited “New Physics”? Or are the measurements or the Standard Model predictions not all they seem? In this seminar, an overview of the latest results in this sector and possible interpretations are discussed.

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Laura Marsolek: Exploring the Jeweler’s Art from Italy to India

Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs South Asia Center presents Exploring the Jeweler’s Art from Italy to India From East to West and across cultural boundaries, the jeweler plays an important part in constructing objects and adornments of splendor. Join Laura Marsolek, graduate of Syracuse University’s Florence Master’s Program in Italian Renaissance Art, and the university’s first Henry Luce Scholar, as she discusses her journey studying the goldsmith’s craft across continents, both in the museum vaults and in the city’s workshops in Florence, Italy and Jodhpur, India. As a Luce Scholar in residence, Laura worked in the curatorial department at Mehrangarh Museum Trust in Jodhpur (2018-19). At SU, she was a member of the Renée Crown University Honors Program and earned her B.F.A. degree in jewelry making and art history (College of Visual and Performing Arts). She went on to complete her M.A. degree in art history from the department of Art and Music Histories (College of Arts and Sciences). For a sneak peek at Laura’s experience as a Luce scholar in India, click here. Laura Marsolek (B.F.A’13, M.A.’17) Fine Jewelry Cataloger, Heritage Auctions, Dallas, Texas Co-sponsored by the Renée Crown University Honors Program and the Department of Art and Music Histories. For more information or to request accommodation arrangements please contact Emera Bridger Wilson, elbridge@syr.edu.

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Book Signing with Col. Eileen M. Collins ’78, H’01, USAF, Ret.

Join us at the Syracuse University Campus Store for a book signing with Military/Veteran Award winner Col. Eileen M. Collins ’78, H’01, USAF, Ret.! Col. Collins is in town for Orange Central and will be signing copies of her newly released book, Through the Glass Ceiling to the Stars: The Story of the First American Woman to Command a Space Mission.

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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Artist Talk: Ronni-Leigh Goeman

Each One, Inspired exhibiting artist Ronni-Leigh Goeman (Onondaga) will offer a lunchtime lecture about her artwork on display, as well as show examples of her other basketry work and discuss the various materials including samples of the tree and grass used.

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Nonfiction Reading Series— Emily Pifer and Robin McCrary

Pifer will read excerpts from her current work and her forthcoming book The Running Body, which was the winner of the 2021 Autumn House Press Nonfiction Contest. In her work Pifer explores the world of competitive running along with questions of the body, gender, place, and belonging. McCrary will read from his memoir-in-essays  Island in the City (University of Nebraska Press, 2018). In his acclaimed book, McCrary offers a searching account of what it means to address “race, sex, money, and what it means to be at home.” —from Eula Biss, author of On Immunity: An Inoculation.   Emily Pifer received her undergraduate degree in journalism from Ohio University, where she competed in track and cross country, and her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Wyoming. She is currently a third-year PhD student in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. At Syracuse, Emily teaches courses in creative nonfiction, critical research and writing, and the practices of academic writing. Her work has recently appeared in The Fiddlehead, and her first book, The Running Body, was selected by Steve Almond as the winner of the 2021 Autumn House Press Nonfiction Contest. It will be published in the fall of 2022. Dr. Robin McCrary is author of Island in the City (University of Nebraska Press), a memoir-in-essays. As Micah McCrary, his work also appears in the Journal of Creative Writing Studies, Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies, and Essay Daily, among other publications. A contributing editor at Assay, Dr. McCrary lives in New York (on Haudenosaunee homelands) where he researches Equity, Inclusion, Diversity, and Internationalization in creative writing pedagogies and teaches at Syracuse University, in addition to serving as a mentor-teacher & low-residency faculty in Wilkes University’s Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing. Note: This is a virtual event. Please contact Eileen Schell for the zoom link. CART will be available, and students are welcome to attend.   The reading is sponsored by the Nonfiction Reading Series of the Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition at Syracuse University.  

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Kelebogile Zvobgo: Do Americans Support War Crimes Prosecutions?

Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs Comparative Politics / International Relations present Kelebogile Zvobgo: Do Americans Support War Crimes Prosecutions?   Do Americans support war crimes prosecutions? Historically, the United States has touted itself as a torchbearer of international criminal justice, leading the establishment of multiple international tribunals, from Germany and Japan to the Balkans and Rwanda. The United States even participated in the drafting of the governing treaty of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Yet the nation has never itself been the subject of an international criminal tribunal – until now. In 2020, the ICC’s chief prosecutor opened a formal investigation into alleged U.S. atrocity crimes relating to the war in Afghanistan. Prior research shows that Americans support the ICC and U.S. membership. However, this work precedes the Afghanistan investigation, leaving open two important questions: (1) is the public’s support conditional on the ICC not investigating and prosecuting U.S. personnel and (2) what discursive frames support or undermine the ICC’s efforts? Building on the literature on U.S. foreign policy public opinion, we theorize that human rights frames increase and national interest frames decrease support for the ICC’s work in Afghanistan. We administer an online survey experiment to test these expectations. We also explore Americans’ preferred venue for war crimes prosecutions: the ICC, U.S. domestic courts, or foreign domestic courts. Kelebogile Zvobgo is an Assistant Professor of Government at William & Mary and Founder and Director of the International Justice Lab. Dr. Zvobgo’s research engages questions in human rights, transitional justice, and international law and courts, and has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals, including International Studies Quarterly and the Journal of Human Rights. It has also been featured in a variety of U.S. media, including newspapers, magazines, podcasts, and television. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Southern California. For more information, contact Dan McDowell, dmcdowel@syr.edu. For accessibility accommodations, please contact jmhoran@syr.edu.

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Alston Lecture Series with Sarah Moss: “A Contextualist Reframing of Encroachment”

The philosophy department welcomes Professor Sarah Moss from University of Michigan for a lecture at the annual William P. Alston Lecture Series. Professor Moss’s lecture is “A Contextualist Reframing of Encroachment.” Be sure to join us that same afternoon from 2-3:30 for an alumni lecture, “Not Feeling Grim about the Reaper,” by Travis Timmerman of Seton Hall,  with commentary by Aaron Wolf of Colgate University.

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Frank Smith: Technology Hype and International Security

Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs Sovereignty, Order and Conflict present Frank L.Smith III U.S. Naval War College   Technology Hype and International Security   Quantum computers. Cyber bombs. Artificial intelligence and killer robots. These technologies are often described as revolutionary innovations that will disrupt modern warfare. Granted, hyperbole is also contested as exaggerated and inaccurate. Yet the effects of technology hype on international security are largely unexamined. In this paper, I explain how discourse that evokes exceptional expectations about future technologies can influence international security, regardless of whether the hype is accurate or not. To show how, I extend the logic of offense-defense theory, technological opportunism, and technological symbolism, particularly as they relate to preventive war, arms races, and secrecy. I also examine empirical evidence about hype over quantum technologies, military cyber, and artificial intelligence. I find that this discourse fuels international conflict more than cooperation. Not all technology hype is accepted by audiences in the national security community, but accepted hype tends to be destabilizing.   Frank L. Smith III is a Professor and Director of the Cyber & Innovation Policy Institute at the U.S. Naval War College. He is also a Non-Resident Fellow with the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. His interdisciplinary research examines how ideas about technology—especially bad ideas—influence national security and international relations. Previous work includes his book, American Biodefense, as well as articles published in Security Studies, Social Studies of Science, Security Dialogue, Health Security, Asian Security, and The Lancet. He has a PhD in political science and a BS in biological chemistry, both from the University of Chicago. For more information, contact Ryan Griffiths, rgriff01@syr.edu. For accessibility arrangements, contact jmhoran@syr.edu

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Pandora Out of the Box: Countering the Conventions of Patriarchy

Society for New Music and the College of Visual and Performing Arts welcomes composer Erin O’Hara, who combines feminist storytelling with punk music to bring the convention-breaking character “Lulu” to life in a re-scoring of the classic silent film, Pandora’s Box, to premiere in March 2022, in Syracuse. This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Conventions.”

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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‘Cuse Fit Chats

‘Cuse Fit Chats are free personalized video chat meetings with a Personal Trainer to help set health and wellness goals.

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Javed Younas: Understanding the Woes of Pakistan’s Electricity Sector and Possible Solutions

Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs South Asia Center presents: Understanding the Woes of Pakistan’s Electricity Sector and Possible Solutions: A Behavioral Approach         Electricity fuels all aspects of our everyday lives, including production, consumption, communication, transportation, and routine financial transactions. Pakistan’s electricity sector has long been facing unprecedented challenges. It is stuck in a bad equilibrium characterized by costly energy production, overloaded infrastructure, high transmission and distribution losses, extraordinary load shedding, and mounting circular debt. Consequently, the economy as a whole suffers from unreliable and poor quality of electricity provision. Why, despite the attention given by every government, has this sector not been able to recover from the bad equilibrium? Drawing upon the findings from our recent work, this talk will mainly focus on the distortions in the distribution system arising from: (i) high distribution losses due to unmetered consumption or theft, and (ii) low revenue recovery.Javed Younas is a Professor of Economics at the American University of Sharjah and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Research in Pakistan. He is spending his sabbatical leave this semester as a Visiting Scholar at the Moynihan Institute. In his previous academic/research positions, he has been an Aman Research Fellow at Harvard University, a Short-term Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and a faculty member at Central Michigan University. His research focus lies in the areas of international political economy, energy economics, conflicts and behavioral economics. He has published widely in well-known journals. His detailed professional information can be viewed at: https://sites.google.com/site/javedyounas/     For more information or to request additional accommodations, please contact Emera Bridger Wilson, elbridge@syr.edu.

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