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Rethinking Addiction: Discussion and Q&A With Dr. Bruce Alexander

The Disability Cultural Center is proud to present world-renowned psychology researcher Dr. Bruce K. Alexander, Professor Emeritus at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. Dr. Alexander’s pivotal Rat Park studies inspired new ways of thinking about mental health, addiction, recovery, and wellness countering the dominant “medical” or “disease” model. This discussion and Q&A with Dr. Alexander is open to anyone seeking to learn more about what addiction is, why it’s so widespread, and how we can think differently about recovery and wellness. This event is co-sponsored by Barnes Center at The Arch, the Falk College Addiction Studies Program, the Office of Disability Services, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

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David Brooks | Visiting Artist Lecture Series

David Brooks (b. 1975 Brazil, Indiana) is an artist whose work considers the relationship between the individual and the built and natural environment. His work investigates how cultural concerns cannot be divorced from the natural world, while also questioning the terms under which nature is perceived and utilized. Brooks has exhibited at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, CT; the Dallas Contemporary; Tang Museum, NY; Nouveau Musée National de Monaco; Sculpture Center, NYC; The Visual Arts Center, Austin; Galerie für Landschaftskunst, Hamburg; Nevada Museum of Art; and MoMA/PS1, among others. Major commissions include Storm King Art Center, NY; deCordova Museum, MA, and Cass Sculpture Foundation, UK, as well as Desert Rooftops in Times Square, a 5000-sq. ft. urban earthwork commissioned by Art Production Fund. Brooks is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including the Rome Prize, a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, a research grant to the Ecuadorian Amazon from the Coypu Foundation, and a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. David Brooks currently is on the faculty of the Maryland Institute College of Art, and lives and works between New York City and New Orleans.  

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Beyond Ethnographic Objectivity: Indigenous Anthropologists and Problems of Fieldwork Access in Nigeria

A Talk by Babajide Ololajulo, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria In this talk, I draw on my experiences conducting fieldwork at “home” in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria to explore concerns that pertain to Nigerian anthropologists carrying out research in their home environments. Traditional anthropologists had in the past invoked the tenet of ethnographic objectivity and other problems of insider research to render the enterprise of ‘anthropology at home’ an inferior brand of the discipline. The notion of the familiar body of the local scholar as devoid of social and economic opportunities remained dominant in research communities, along with the idea that this hinders the fieldwork engagements of indigenous anthropologists. In this talk, I argue instead that the problem of access for the indigenous anthropologist comes with deleterious implications for the decolonization of knowledge produced about Africa. Babajide Ololajulo is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He is a development anthropologist with research interests ranging over politics of identity, heritage and memory, and the political economy of oil exploration in Nigeria. He has published widely on these themes. Dr. Ololajulo is an alumnus of the University of Michigan African Presidential Scholars program (UMAPS), a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS-AHP), and a Leventis fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has also received travel grants from UK ESRC and SEPHIS to attend workshops in the United Kingdom, Brazil and Peru. His recent book, Unshared Identity published by the African Humanities Program, employs the practice of posthumous paternity to explore African endogenous ways of being and meaning-making.

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North Koreans in Japan: Identity, Education, and the Struggle Against Colonialism

A Talk by Derek R. Ford, Assistant Professor of Education Studies at DePauw University There are around 800,000 Koreans living in Japan today who are foreign nationals or “special permanent residents.” Even though they’ve resided in Japan since before the Korean peninsula was divided and can now acquire Japanese citizenship, most today are citizens of either North or South Korea. Their situation, largely unknown in the West, provides a crucial lens through which to understand the myriad aspects of Korean conflict as the result of an unfinished struggle for national liberation. In this presentation, Dr. Ford details the history and present of Koreans in Japan through the development of Chongryon (The National Association of Korean Residents in Japan), a North Korean-affiliated institution that maintains dozens of schools, neighborhood associations, sports teams, professional and cultural organizations, and more. Derek R. Ford is an assistant professor of education studies at DePauw University who leads the only exchange program between US and Chongryon students.

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Elif Batuman, the Richard Elman Reader | Raymond Carver Reading Series

Elif Batuman has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2010. She is the author of “The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them.” The recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and a Paris Review Terry Southern Prize for Humor, she also holds a PhD in comparative literature from Stanford University. The Idiot is her first novel. She lives in Brooklyn, NY. The Raymond Carver Reading Series features twelve to fourteen prominent writers yearly as part of a large undergraduate class taught by TAs from the Creative Writing Program. All readings are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45-4:30 p.m. The public is welcome. The readings have been recorded and are in the process of being made available online by Bird Library at SUrface.

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What is the Council of Europe and Why it Matters?

Elena Hedoux, Council of Europe Thomas Kattau, Council of Europe Today the European political landscape is marked by the persistent question about the capacity of democratic systems to meet the population’s expectations. Europe experiences an increase in authoritarian temptations and a resurgence of nationalism. This puts Council of Europe, celebrating 70 years of existence, to the test. In this time it has succeeded in creating a common legal space for 47 countries based on its core mission: to promote and uphold the values of democracy, human rights and respect for the rule of law. The Council promotes a model of democratic governance that is the hallmark of the European model together with the human rights protection mechanism. This model is currently challenged and the Council of Europe is working on its role to remain relevant.

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Wayétu Moore, Distinguished Visiting Writer | Raymond Carver Reading Series

Wayétu Moore is the author of She Would Be King, released by Graywolf Press. Her writing can be found in The Paris Review, Frieze Magazine, Guernica, The Atlantic Magazine and other publications. She has been featured in The Economist Magazine, NPR, NBC, BET and ABC, among others, for her work in advocacy for diversity in children’s literature. Moore is an Africana Studies lecturer at City University of New York’s John Jay College and lives in Brooklyn, NY. She is also the founder of One Moore Book. The Raymond Carver Reading Series features twelve to fourteen prominent writers yearly as part of a large undergraduate class taught by TAs from the Creative Writing Program. All readings are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45-4:30 p.m. The public is welcome. The readings have been recorded and are in the process of being made available online by Bird Library at SUrface.

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Dawn Weleski | Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Dawn Weleski’s art practice administers a political stress test, antagonizing routine cultural behavior by re-purposing underground brawls, revolutionary protests, and political offices as transformative social stages. Recent projects include City Council Wrestling, a series of public wrestling matches where citizens, pro-am wrestlers, and city council members personified their political passions into wrestling characters and Conflict Kitchen (with Jon Rubin), a take-out restaurant that serves cuisine from countries with which the U.S. government is in conflict, which was the 2015 North American finalist for the International Award for Public Art. Weleski has exhibited at The Mercosul Biennial, Hammer Museum, San Jose Museum of Art, Anyang Public Art Project, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art, Project Row Houses, Townhouse Gallery (Cairo), Festival Belluard Bollwerk International, The Mattress Factory Museum, Arts House (Melbourne) and 91mQ (Berlin); has been a resident at The Headlands Center for the Arts, SOMA Mexico City, and The Atlantic Center for the Arts; and is a 2017 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Curatorial Fellow. Currently, Weleski is NEH Visiting Assistant Professor of Art & Art History at Colgate University. In collaboration with CNY and Upstate New York residents, she is investigating the aesthetics and dramaturgy of historical and contemporary mutual aid societies, which will culminate in a participatory, public initiative that highlights how mutual aid contributes to belonging and othering and will problematize definitions of resiliency, community, and the rural radical.

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