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Quarterly Economic and Market Update

Join this TIAA webinar to take a closer look at their views on the financial markets, including key market drivers, U.S. economy, policy and politics, and investing in public markets. This presentation will also cover the challenges that investors face and how to navigate them.

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The Power of Saving

Whether you’re the kind of person that lives and spends in the now or plans for what’s ahead, there are always ways to save smarter. In this TIAA webinar, you’ll learn a number of strategies for better managing your money so you have the knowledge and confidence to pay your bills, save for a rainy day and achieve other financial goals.

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W2W Attention to Detail: Financial Finishing Touches for Women

Am I ready to retire? How do I know if I have enough? How do I plan my income? What should I look out for as I plan and even after I am retired? Financial success can often complicate your life and this presentation by TIAA will to try to help you answer those questions and more.

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Making Gifts to Loved Ones and Charities

You can help to maximize the value of your life’s work and help to take care of your survivors and philanthropic causes with a little planning. TIAA will review basic strategies for giving to individuals and charities during your lifetime, as well as legacy planning.

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Tribute to Maria Lugones

The Democratizing Knowledge Collective at Syracuse University invites you to Tribute to María Lugones. María Lugones was a feminist philosopher, popular educator, professor, author, and community organizer.  Join the DK collective to honor her legacy alongside guest speakers and the co-editors of Speaking Face to Face: The Visionary Philosophy of María Lugones (SUNY 2019). Speakers: Dr. M. Jacqui Alexander (Tobago Centre) Maestra Cherríe Moraga (Las Maestras Center – University of California, Santa Barbara) Dr. Anna Carastathis (Panteion University, Greece) Dr. Emma Velez (UI at Urbana-Champaign) Dr. Kelli D. Zaytoun (Wright University) Co-editors of Speaking Face to Face: Dr. PJ DiPietro (Syracuse University) Dr. Jennifer McWeeny (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Dr. Shireen Roshanravan (Kansas State University) ASL will be provided – Spanish Interpretation provided.

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Art and Music Histories Colloquium: Protecting Culture in Conflict: The Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative

The Department of Art and Music Histories in the College of Arts and Sciences welcomes Cori Wegener, Director, Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative for a virtual talk. The Smithsonian has always been dedicated to preservation of cultural heritage around the world. This mission took on a new urgency after the 2010 Haiti earthquake when Cori Wegener teamed up with Smithsonian staff and other partners to deploy a cultural heritage disaster response team that evolved into the Cultural Rescue Initiative. Since then the team has deployed worldwide on numerous training, equipping, and rescue efforts in response to both natural and manmade disasters. Wegener will describe her journey from curator to defender of cultural heritage in places like Iraq, Syria, and Mali and the Smithsonian’s recent efforts to train the next generation of U.S. Army Monuments Officers.

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Art and Music Histories Colloquium: Dismantling the Panopticon Ear

The Department of Art and Music Histories in the College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to welcome Nina Eidsheim professor of musicology at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. Nina is also the Founder & Director of the Practice-based Experimental Epistemology (PEER Lab). About the Talk In the United States, listening pedagogy has been formed within a particular point of privilege – whiteness – and underpins every relationship, both personal and institutional. For instance, listening pedagogy within an opera company is aimed at singers through all the other roles an opera company fills. As directors, C.E.O.s, presidents of the board, conductors and so on, these candidates serve as the institution’s ear, amplifying a certain kind of listening across all nodes of a large and complex institution. Listening pedagogy then teaches and normalizes, for singers and audiences alike, a listening invested in whiteness. A listening pedagogy that is invested in whiteness takes the sound of a particular voice as a given, and it conceives of the voice as a closed system. That is, it believes that the sound the voice makes is the essential sound of a person. This listening serves to confirm the listener’s attitudes and values, just as the panopticon preserves a particular power relationship. But by considering the voice’s materiality and performativity, Nina proposes to turn the skill of the panopticon ear—an internalized listening stance we all possess without necessarily knowing we have it—from an instrument invested in whiteness to a sharpened antiracist tool.

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