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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 1

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 2

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

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30 Min Crash Course: Resumes 101

Falk College students are invited to join the Falk College Career Services team for a short session exploring how to write a good resume. We’ll Review: Example resume formats How VMock (online platform) can assist Strengthening the wording of those almighty bullet points

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30 Min Crash Course: Where to Search for Jobs/Internships

Falk College students are invited to join the Falk College Career Services team for a short session exploring some of the best places to search for jobs and internships. We’ll Review: Various platforms to search for jobs SU and Falk specific sites Networking to create your own opportunities

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Data Visualization 101: A Tableau Workshop

Data Visualization 101 is a bootcamp built for graduate students in any and all disciplines. Whether you’re a poet or a chemist, this hands-on Tableau workshop is designed to empower you to turn the data that surrounds you into information you can use. Not really sure what data even is? No problem, this workshop kicks off at the very beginning. We’ll build visualizations you’ll recognize and ones you’ve never seen, stitch those visualizations into an interactive dashboard, and dive into how you can develop and leverage your newfound skill set as a student and after you graduate. The workshop will be led by Erin Waldron, owner/operator of the visual analytics consultancy Data Dozen. Prior to the workshop, registrants will receive instructions for downloading Tableau Public and the data set that will be used to demo the platform. The event is co-sponsored by the Graduate School and the GSO.

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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 3

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

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30 Min Crash Course: Cover Letters 101

Falk College students are invited to join the Falk College Career Services team for a short session exploring how to write a good cover letter. We’ll Review: 2 Strategies for writing a solid cover letter Recommended format A few well-written examples

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Publishing Your Humanities Book: Know Your Audience, Reach Your Readers

The Syracuse University Humanities Center, Office of Research, and College of Arts and Sciences are pleased to host two editors from Stanford University Press offering insightful information about publishing your humanities book. Register for the general session by Feb. 12 and include any accessibility accommodation requests. Additional Opportunity! Following the general session at noon, Irvin and Wetter have set aside additional time for one-on-one consultation with faculty who have questions related to their specific humanities book projects. These brief meetings will be scheduled on the half hour — between 2:00 and 6:00 pm on 2/19/21. A wait-list will be created if interest exceeds limited slots. [NOTE: Those who request individual consultation are expected to attend the general session at noon.] Request an individual consultation here by Feb. 12 and include any accessibility accommodation requests. Biographies: Margo Irvin, Acquisitions Editor, acquires in history, Jewish studies, Asian American studies, and Latin American studies. In history, Margo’s list includes modern European and world history, colonial and modern Latin American history, and a new strand in American history with a particular focus on the history of the American West and transnational US histories. She is particularly interested in projects that take up questions around histories of empire, imperialism, and colonialism; nationalism and citizenship; migration and borderlands; the history of science, technology, computing, and information; and the intersections of medicine and health with gender and race. Margo acquires for two long-running interdisciplinary series: Asian America and Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture. She is also the press editor for Stanford Studies on Central and Eastern Europe and the Cold War International History Project series. Erica Wetter, Executive Editor, acquires books in Literature, Philosophy, and Religion. Her list encompasses work in political theory, art, media, and cultural studies, and she is particularly seeking projects that attempt to make significant critical interventions while asking questions of contemporary relevance. She welcomes accessible, broadly conceived projects on politics, gender, race, science, technology, and media and is especially open to discussing more interdisciplinary works as well as books that attempt some form of narrative innovation. Erica holds an MLIS and an MS in Environmental Studies and is also committed to publishing rigorous work in environmental humanities. Her portfolio includes several series, such as Text Technologies, Post45, Cultural Memory in the Present, Encountering Traditions, and Spiritual Phenomena.

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Introductory Workshop in Supporting Communication

Typing to Communicate: Developing Frameworks for Support and Learning to be a Facilitator Typing to Communicate is one method used in accessing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) equipment. This two-day workshop provides the opportunity to learn the techniques necessary to be a facilitator within the context of the principles common to all communication support approaches. We will discuss the “why” and “how” of typing to communicate, along with strategies for integration in school and community settings. ICI staff will work with participants to establish a plan for continued support after the zoom training. Fees: $100 per person; group rates available for three or more people upon request. Payment can be done by mailing a check to the ICI or paying by credit card online. Typers can attend the workshop along with their facilitator free of charge; this would be helpful for hands on practice sessions. Workshop is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. (eastern) both days.

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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 1

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

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30 Min Crash Course: LinkedIn 101 – Creating your Profile

Falk College students are invited to join the Falk College Career Services team for a short session exploring how to create an impactful LinkedIn profile. We’ll Review: Example LinkedIn Profiles Tips on writing your: TAGLINE, ABOUT & EXPERIENCE Sections Growing your ‘Connections’

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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 2

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

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Engaging Faculty in Meaningful Discussions on Student Learning

Anne Mosher, Associate Professor & Provost Faculty Fellow for Shared Competencies & High Impact Practices, will share practices that worked for her department to discuss student learning collaboratively. Anne will share how she transferred her expertise in geography and civic education to mapping program-level student learning outcomes and course learning objectives which resulted in revising student learning outcomes. Zoom link will be sent to participants upon registration.

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Write Winning Grant Proposals: National Science Foundation (NSF) Focus

Syracuse University’s Office of Research is pleased to sponsor Write Winning Grant Proposals: National Science Foundation (NSF) Focus. This workshop will comprehensively address both practical and conceptual aspects that are important to writing competitive grant proposals to NSF. In this two-day program, Dr. Lauren Broyles from the Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops will emphasize proposal idea development, identification of the appropriate program office, how to write for reviewers, and a detailed breakdown of proposal components. The content includes material for applications to NSF, although much of the workshop is applicable to other funding agencies. This workshop is appropriate for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and administrative staff who have had some exposure to writing grant applications, either through training, mentoring, or personal experience. All participants will receive an extensive handout, as well as a hardcopy of The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook. This is a two-day workshop and will take place virtually on March 11 and 12, 8:30-noon each day. Note that both parts are critical for maximal understanding and future usage of the directed writing approach. This workshop is open to Syracuse University faculty, staff, and graduate students and our colleagues at SUNY ESF and SUNY Upstate. Correction: Syracuse University’s Graduate School will sponsor fees for the first 75 eligible PhD students from NSF-supported fields who register for the workshop. Eligibility will be confirmed after registration. Update January 21, 2021: All graduate slots have been filled. Existing registrants will be notified if their registration was accepted within the next week. If you are a graduate student still wishing to register, please check back on this page on February 1 for additional information. Fees: • Syracuse University Faculty and Staff: $100 • Syracuse University PhD Students (first 75 registrants): All slots filled. • SUNY ESF and SUNY Upstate Registrants: $150  

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Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities, Part 3

Faculty are invited to participate in the two-hour workshops “Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities parts 1, 2, and 3.” Offered by the division of Faculty Affairs within the Office of Academic Affairs, the fast-paced workshops will offer a series of potential responses that participants choose and practice, peer to peer. Real-life scenarios from the college/school/department context will be employed. Interested faculty should attend! The intermediate sessions give faculty ways to frame the intimate conversations that happen in classrooms when discussing race, class, gender, nationality, ethnicity, religion, ability, sexual and gender identity, as well as other pertinent topics. “We want people to continually engage in these learning opportunities around diversity and inclusion,” says Marie Garland, assistant provost for faculty affairs. “We want people to practice interactions and to practice responding to interactions that decrease equity and inclusion in a learning environment.” Developed by School of Education Professors Jeff Mangram and Melissa Luke, this professional development opportunity applies research-supported interpersonal group leadership strategies and focuses on responding to and transforming “hot moments.” “Hot moments are when someone says or does something that creates inequity or communicates less than full inclusion of all students in the learning space,” says Mangram. “This workshop empowers faculty members, as leaders in the learning space, to respond to these moments so they can right the ship and help students learn.” Luke adds that “by increasing the range of potential responses, faculty are more prepared to transform hot moments into learning experiences that center the well-being of their students.” These three workshops are inter-related but not sequential. They are designed so that faculty can attend starting with any of the three sessions and proceed with the remaining workshops. These workshops are part of the university commitment to professional development opportunities related to diversity, belonging, inclusion and equity offered throughout the academic year. Contact Jeff Mangram at jamangra@syr.edu and Melissa Luke at mmluke@syr.edu for more information about scheduling.

Categories:

Write Winning Grant Proposals: National Science Foundation (NSF) Focus

Syracuse University’s Office of Research is pleased to sponsor Write Winning Grant Proposals: National Science Foundation (NSF) Focus. This workshop will comprehensively address both practical and conceptual aspects that are important to writing competitive grant proposals to NSF. In this two-day program, Dr. Lauren Broyles from the Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops will emphasize proposal idea development, identification of the appropriate program office, how to write for reviewers, and a detailed breakdown of proposal components. The content includes material for applications to NSF, although much of the workshop is applicable to other funding agencies. This workshop is appropriate for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and administrative staff who have had some exposure to writing grant applications, either through training, mentoring, or personal experience. All participants will receive an extensive handout, as well as a hardcopy of The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook. This is a two-day workshop and will take place virtually on March 11 and 12, 8:30-noon each day. Note that both parts are critical for maximal understanding and future usage of the directed writing approach. This workshop is open to Syracuse University faculty, staff, and graduate students and our colleagues at SUNY ESF and SUNY Upstate. Correction: Syracuse University’s Graduate School will sponsor fees for the first 75 eligible PhD students from NSF-supported fields who register for the workshop. Eligibility will be confirmed after registration. Update January 21, 2021: All graduate slots have been filled. Existing registrants will be notified if their registration was accepted within the next week. If you are a graduate student still wishing to register, please check back on this page on February 1 for additional information.   Fees: • Syracuse University Faculty and Staff: $100 • Syracuse University PhD Students (first 75 registrants): All slots filled. • SUNY ESF and SUNY Upstate Registrants: $150

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NEH Regional Grant-Writing Workshop

In this virtual workshop, program officers from the NEH Division of Education will provide an overview of NEH grant opportunities, a review of sample applications to discuss application-writing strategies, and Q & A. Jointly hosted by the Office of Research and the Central New York Humanities Corridor (CNY Corridor), as headquartered at the Syracuse University Humanities Center, this virtual workshop is open to all members of CNY Corridor institutions. A link to register for the workshop will be provided closer to the event.

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Office of Research Awareness: Building an Evaluation Plan for Projects and Proposals

This workshop will provide strategies and models for designing effective program and proposal evaluation plans. It will offer attendees insights into and resources for developmental evaluation practices, implementation tracking, and an overview of evaluation frameworks. Approaches will align with the guidelines of the National Research Council as well as professional criteria for program effectiveness. The program will also include methods for crafting evaluation plans into proposal narrative addressing varied funder RFPs. We will discuss evaluation “degrees of separation”  related to internal vs external evaluators. Register in advance for this meeting: https://syracuseuniversity.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAkceqhqT8iHdNj6Ef1N1R7KsePSEwmf74O After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

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